Category

Central America

Category
Guatemala

I absolutely loved Lake Atitlan. Imagine a very blue lake surrounded by mountains, with lots of cute villages dotting the shore. If you come to Guatemala, you should definitely stop here. Take as much time as you can because there are lots of things to do and see.

One of my favourite parts about Lake Atitlan was going to the many villages that surround the lake. We took a boat and just hopped from one place to another. Along the way, we admired street art, sat in cafes and tasted local chocolate. It was an amazing day. I just advise you to start early, because the weather tends to get more and more cloudy during the day.

If you’re heading to Lake Atitlan yourself, here are my five favourite villages that you should visit.…

Honduras

Utila is a Caribbean dream. Full of white beaches, sandy paths and colourful wooden houses, this is how I always imagined paradise to be like. The region reminded me a bit of Bocas del Toro in Panama and just like I had loved Bocas, I loved Utila.

We spent almost three days here, exploring the island, floating in crystal-clear water and chasing colourful fish. Utila is known for its reefs and most people come here to either learn to dive, to become a diving instructor or to just spend a few days exploring the underwater world. And while Daniel and I had gotten our diving certifications in Thailand, it had been more than six months since then and I didn’t want to do a refresher course.…

El Salvador

This post was last updated in October 2019. We did this trip in April 2018 and not much has changed since then. The busses and colectivos still stop in the same places and even prices remained stable.

After nine days in Honduras, Copan was our last stop. We had a great day here, exploring the Mayan ruins and observing macaws and toucans on Macaw Mountain. But eventually, the time came for us to leave and that’s when it got complicated.

We knew that we wanted to go to El Salvador next. Ideally, we would make our way from Copan to Santa Ana, but we were also prepared to stop in San Salvador since we knew transport was going to be difficult.…

Costa Rica

During the last ten months of travelling, transportation had always been straightforward. Along the Silk Road, I did an overland tour and used a truck. Through Southeast Asia, we went by bus. Those buses were comfortable and drove from one touristic place to the next. In French Polynesia, buses were irregular but distances were mostly short and I had more than enough time to wait. And in South America, I might have had to switch buses once, but rarely more than that.

It wasn’t until I got to Costa Rica that I faced my first challenge. We were in Puerto Viejo de Talamanca and wanted to go to Tortuguero – without taking one of those very expensive shuttles that cost two or three times as much as public transport.…

Costa Rica

As I mentioned before, one of the most interesting parts of travelling is meeting people along the way. While language is an issue (even though my Spanish is getting better, I still find it hard to have a proper conversation with anyone), I was lucky and could at least get to know some of our guides better. In Costa Rica, I already did an interview with Ricardo, whose family was involved in the founding process of the Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve. But I also got the chance of meeting Harvin, a young guide who helped us find a red-eyed tree frog in La Fortuna.

Harvin’s story is an interesting one and I am very happy that he agreed to do an interview with me.…

Meet the locals

Last week, I got the chance to visit the Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve. While the weather was rainy and cloudy (I guess that’s why it’s called a cloud forest) and we did not get to see many animals, we walked through a beautiful forest. And I had the opportunity of meeting Ricardo. He was our jungle guide, someone whose family had been around at the founding time of Monteverde, and he was nice enough to agree to do an interview with me.…

Meet the locals

The best part about travelling are the amazing people I meet along the way. One of them is Dorothy, an American expat living near Boquete in Panama with her family. She runs Jungla de Panama, a wildlife refuge where she helps injured and abandoned animals, and she agreed to do an interview with me so I could learn more about this fascinating woman and her story.…

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